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Situation


Only 38% of women in rural  areas in Kenya give birth in medical facilities. Yet, 90% of women bring their newborns in for routine vaccinations. Commonly cited reasons for giving birth at home include lack of money for transportation, rapid onset of labour, cultural barriers, family tradition, shame, myths. Deaths of girls and women from child-birth and other pregnancy-related causes remain high in Kenya, with 7,000 maternal and 35,000 infant deaths each year.

The health risks associated with giving birth at home go well beyond delivery. When mothers give birth at home, their babies often start their immunizations late and tend to miss out on critical vaccinations, such as polio and Rota. Since HIV is usually detected in pre-natal screening or during labor, giving birth in a medical facility would allow the clinic to coach the mother on a long-term treatment program and how to breastfeed the newborn without passing on the virus.

Mission


To reduce maternal and infant mortality rates with an incentive gift for mothers to give birth in hospital.

The gift is a postnatal care bag with products and health information, which we fund by selling Do Right bracelets online, in stores, at weekly markets and pop-up shops in Nairobi. Our bracelets are made by incarcerated young women and mothers in Kenya.

An internal evaluation report, completed in 2018, revealed the following promising results: 

• 98% of mothers who received a Do Right bag say that they would be more likely to give birth in a clinic again because of the bag. 

• Since the program began, more mothers have been giving birth in clinics, and the number of cases of home births (estimated by the number of mothers who came to the clinic for their newborn's inoculations but did not give birth in the clinic) has decreased. 

• 96% of mothers said they were very satisfied with the Do Right program, and 94% said they would recommend the program to their friends. 

• 72% of mothers receiving Do Right bags were previously unfamiliar with the information provided in the maternity pamphlet. 

Situation


Only 38% of women in rural  areas in Kenya give birth in medical facilities. Yet, 90% of women bring their newborns in for routine vaccinations. Commonly cited reasons for giving birth at home include lack of money for transportation, rapid onset of labour, cultural barriers, family tradition, shame, myths. Deaths of girls and women from child-birth and other pregnancy-related causes remain high in Kenya, with 7,000 maternal and 35,000 infant deaths each year.

The health risks associated with giving birth at home go well beyond delivery. When mothers give birth at home, their babies often start their immunizations late and tend to miss out on critical vaccinations, such as polio and Rota. Since HIV is usually detected in pre-natal screening or during labor, giving birth in a medical facility would allow the clinic to coach the mother on a long-term treatment program and how to breastfeed the newborn without passing on the virus.

Mission


To reduce maternal and infant mortality rates with an incentive gift for mothers to give birth in hospital.

The gift is a postnatal care bag with products and health information, which we fund by selling Do Right bracelets online, in stores, at weekly markets and pop-up shops in Nairobi. Our bracelets are made by incarcerated young women and mothers in Kenya.

An internal evaluation report, completed in 2018, revealed the following promising results: 

• 98% of mothers who received a Do Right bag say that they would be more likely to give birth in a clinic again because of the bag. 

• Since the program began, more mothers have been giving birth in clinics, and the number of cases of home births (estimated by the number of mothers who came to the clinic for their newborn's inoculations but did not give birth in the clinic) has decreased. 

• 96% of mothers said they were very satisfied with the Do Right program, and 94% said they would recommend the program to their friends. 

• 72% of mothers receiving Do Right bags were previously unfamiliar with the information provided in the maternity pamphlet. 

Testimonials

I am 16-years-old. I dropped out of primary school in class 7, because of my pregnancy. I live without running water or permanent structure. My mother washes clothes to support us. I’m not sure how I would have coped without the clinic and the Do Right package. I will tell all, especially teenagers, that they must deliver at the clinic.

Teenager, Lamu.

The Do Right mother's package complete with nappies, soap, and education pamphlet and much more, is a noble low cost and sustainable idea that can play a significant role in reducing maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality, which remain highest in our counties of Northern Kenya. The packages have made a tremendous impact at Lewa's clinic. 

John Kinoti, Community development program manager, Lewa Wildlife Conservancy.

The maternity kits are very popular with the mothers and the broader community. They do something to encourage even women who do not come to the clinic for births, because of fear of being caught for illegal circumcision, to come. It seems that all the items in the package are helpful and used. There is special mention of the excellent quality of the blankets.

Nurse May Makau, Shella Dispensary Lamu County.